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Showing posts from April, 2021

Onion Skin Archive Book Scanning - What is this and how do we process the pages?

CURRENT PROJECT We are currently working on a very large archive of old books that require HQ scanning to Archival TIFF images.  Once processed, these images will be OCR (optical character recognition) applied before being prepared to PDF format.   The difficulty in this order, is the books are prepared using a medium called Onion Skin Paper. Whilst we are very confident in preparing this type of medium, it is very important to be aware that there are risks with scanning, given the sometimes-fragile nature of the paper.   Tears and rips can occur, so a very gentle white glove approach is required. Equally, with the nature of onion skin, the paper is very translucent which requires a sheet of white paper to be placed under each page before scanning. This then grants a very good HQ image that we can work with.   WHAT IS ONION SKIN PAPER? Onion skin paper is a type of very light weight, almost translucent paper that somewhat resembles the outer skins of an onion.  It is also

What is high-resolution audio?

What is high-resolution audio? Our studio works with many clients offering options for audio outputs.  More often we get asked by corporate or archives for high resolution audio.   There are several options for audio output which is explained below. Unlike  high-definition video , there’s no single universal standard for hi-res audio. In 2014, the Digital Entertainment Group, Consumer Electronics Association and The Recording Academy, together with record labels,  formally defined high-resolution audio  as “lossless audio that is capable of reproducing the full range of sound from recordings that have been mastered from better than CD quality music sources". In its simplest terms, hi-res audio tends to refer to music files that have a higher sampling frequency and/or bit depth than CD, which is specified at 16-bit/44.1kHz. Sampling frequency (or sample rate) refers to the number of times samples of the signal are taken per second during the analogue-to-digital conversion process.